Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

Telitacicept reduces gMG severity in Phase 2 study

Nearly six months of treatment with RemeGen’s telitacicept (RC18) lessened disease activity in adults with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) who are positive for antibodies targeting the acetylcholine receptor, according to data from a Phase 2 clinical trial in China. “Telitacicept demonstrated safety [and] good tolerability and reduced clinical…

MG treatment side effects common, especially in women: Survey

Patients, especially women, experience a high degree of side effects from myasthenia gravis (MG) treatment, according to a U.K. survey examining real-world use of the medications. As steroid-sparing agents, mycophenolate mofetil (sold as CellCept) and methotrexate (sold as Trexall, among others) were less likely to be discontinued…

Use of off-label Vyvgart successful in case of hard-to-treat gMG

A woman with hard-to-treat generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) who was seronegative, or tested negative for disease-driving self-directed antibodies, was successfully treated with off-label Vyvgart (efgartigimod alfa-fcab), as reported in a case study from Italy. According to researchers, this case provides evidence that limiting Vyvgart to MG patients with…

Soliris benefits maintained after patients switch to Ultomiris: Study

The initial treatment benefits of Soliris (eculizumab) were maintained after people with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) switched over to Ultomiris (ravulizumab-cwvz), a small real-world study confirmed. Most patients who completed a survey almost six months after switching said they preferred Ultomiris due to treatment convenience, lower frequency…

Under-the-skin efgartigimod wins approval in UK for gMG adults

An under-the-skin, or subcutaneous, injectable formulation of efgartigimod alfa has been approved in the U.K. as an add-on therapy for adults with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) who test positive for antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). This new formulation will be marketed in the U.K. as Subcutaneous Vyvgart. In…

MicroRNAs in blood may help diagnose ocular MG, study suggests

Three microRNAs (miRNAs) — small strands of RNA that regulate protein production — in blood samples accurately identified people with early-onset ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG) and distinguished them from early-onset generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) patients and healthy people in a recent study. “These results suggested that the three…