Lindsey Shapiro, PhD, science writer —

Lindsey earned her PhD in neuroscience from Emory University in Atlanta, where she studied novel therapeutic strategies for treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy. She was awarded a fellowship from the American Epilepsy Society in 2019 for this research. Lindsey also previously worked as a postdoctoral researcher, studying the role of inflammation in epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease.

Articles by Lindsey Shapiro

Findings in UCB’s Myasthenia Gravis Pivotal Trials Detailed

Two investigational UCB treatments for generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) — zilucoplan and rozanolixizumab — continue to show benefits in gMG patients, according to recently reported findings from Phase 3 trials. Both delivered as subcutaneous (under-the-skin) injections, zilucoplan works by blocking an immune system protein called C5 that…

Ultomiris Approved in Europe for Adults With AChR-positive gMG

The European Commission has approved Ultomiris (ravulizumab) as an add-on to standard therapy for adults with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). Eligible patients will be positive for antibodies targeting the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) — the most common type of MG-causing antibody. Ultomiris is now the first long-acting C5 complement…

Spherix Analyzes Reviews of gMG Therapies, Vyvgart, Ultomiris

Neurologists find both Vyvgart (efgartigimod) and Ultomiris (ravulizumab-cwvz) effective for treating generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG), but believe Ultomiris has a more convenient dosing schedule while Vyvgart may have a better safety profile. That’s according to a recent analysis by the market intelligence firm Spherix Global Insights.

Report Examines Anesthetic Management of Subclinical MG

Careful administration and monitoring of anesthetic medications may prevent complications in people with subclinical myasthenia gravis (MG) undergoing surgery, a case report suggests. The findings, concerning a woman receiving surgery to remove a thymoma — a tumor of the thymus — suggest that anesthetic management of subclinical MG may…

Ocular MG Signs Emerge After COVID-19 Vaccine But Cause Unclear

A man developed signs of myasthenia gravis (MG) with eye symptoms about a month after receiving the first shot of Oxford-AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine, a case study reports. “This case report implies that COVID-19 vaccination may cause myasthenia gravis with ocular symptoms,” the researchers wrote. “But we should also consider…

European Committee Recommends Efgartigimod Approval for gMG

European regulators have recommended efgartigimod be approved as an add-on therapy for adults with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) who have anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies. This recommendation, from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), will serve as the basis for a final regulatory decision from the…