How MG Has Made Me a Better Person

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by Michelle Gonzaba |

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Strength in Weakness column by Michelle Gonzaba / grief

Growing up, for lack of a better term, is very weird. I no longer understand what’s cool or not, I now repeat phrases my mother says (“All of these rappers sound the same!”), and my lower back can’t handle my odd sitting positions anymore. I didn’t think I would stay young forever, but I never thought time would move this fast.

So while I may be slowly morphing into my mother, I can’t say that growing up is all bad. Not only am I lucky enough to still be around, but I am also learning and growing every single day. And like most people, I’ve learned the most from my hardest journeys.

I’ve spent plenty of time reflecting on how myasthenia gravis has added strain and hurt to my life. But as I’ve gotten older and lived with MG for longer, I’ve noticed how it has actually improved my life in certain ways.

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Resting and Resetting With Positive Intention

Compared with my teenage self, I am now infinitely more grateful for what I have. So much was taken from me when I was diagnosed, and for a while, the things I’d lost were all I could think about.

But I’ve finally decided to look at my life in a different way and appreciate what I do have. I can never get back those difficult times when weakness was ravaging my body. However, I can be very grateful for every doctor and nurse who helped me get better and stronger. With a lot of practice, I’ve learned to look for the positives first instead of the negatives.

MG has also taught me to take my time and really think through my decisions. With MG, a person must thoroughly think about how they will get through the day. Now, not only do I think about my daily activities, I take my time with major decisions. Instead of making a choice based on temporary feelings, I now exercise patience. If I can teach myself to rest after walking short distances, then surely I can apply that practice to other moments in my life.

However, the most positive impact MG has had is teaching me what is and isn’t important. After suffering a myasthenic crisis, most of the things I would freak out about became a lot less important. It’s crazy how being unable to breathe really puts things into perspective.

It’s possible that some of these positives naturally happen as humans grow older, but I like to look for meaning in things that initially bring me pain. MG, like any other rare disease, isn’t easy to deal with. But for me, it’s not all gloom and doom. Every event we experience brings both good and bad, and I’ve decided to focus on the good.

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Myasthenia Gravis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

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2021 Myasthenia Gravis Survey Results

BioNews Survey Infographic

Myasthenia Gravis News conducted a survey from Feb. 11-March 28 to gain greater insight into the characteristics of the MG community and disease management. Results of the survey have now been published. Click on the image to view the infographic, and click here to read the story.