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    • #17184
      Michelle Gonzaba
      Participant

      It takes a lot of energy to take care of a pet, so those with MG may have trouble keeping up with a dog, cat, or another animal.

      How has MG changed the way you take care of your pets? What tips would you give to someone who’s having trouble caring for their animals?

    • #17194
      Charles Karcher
      Participant

      Unfortunately both my dogs died within 8 months of my diagnosis.  It does take a lot of energy to give them the proper care.  So far I have decided to not get another pet.  I really don’t have someone I can trust or impose on to take care of a pet should my illness render me unable to care for them.  Also I was a late onset diagnosis and now at age 69 fear that I would probably be outlived by the new pet leaving it to an uncertain fate in the case of my mortality.  I know this all sounds very morbid or depressed but I have owned dogs all my life and do not want provide substandard care for a new pet.

      • #17215
        Kay
        Participant

        I have 2 Golden Retrievers currently and am planning on getting a puppy next year. My husband’s Golden boy is 11 1/2 years old and my boy is 6. I train and show him in both obedience and rally. Show weekends are tough because they start early and run late, which is very tiring, as I need more sleep now that I used to with my MG.  I go to bed early on show weekends so I can get enough sleep. Summertime heat can also be an issue for my MG. I can train in the house or the club training bldg. I try to keep my training sessions short and happy. Training and showing are my passions and I am blessed to be able to continue to do what I love!

    • #17200
      Judith Kauffman
      Participant

      I have a very active pet and am fortunate to have a energetic husband.  He does the long walks.   I am able to do very short ones but she is satisfied with that .  I was diagnosed 6 years ago. I am now 74.  It is a daily challenge.

    • #17220
      Amy Cessina
      Participant

      I have 4 cats and a dog. I am good since I have a husband and three kids only one left at home. But I completely understand Charles compassion about  not leaving a pet behind or going into the hospital and not having a back up caregiver. Pets are a lot of work but they do give me a good mental boost .

    • #17221
      Dave Hall
      Participant

      I would not choose to live without my pets.  When I was younger (pre MG) I did obedience, fly ball, agility, and hunt tests with my dogs.  I no longer can do the dog sports that I loved.  But now that I am old and retired, I own a small farm and my wife is big on Sheep Dog Trials.  She will be gone for a weekend or nearly a week while competing all over the country.  The feeding of all the dogs she did not take to a trial falls to me.  The last trial she went to she only took one dog.  That left me taking care of six dogs and the three cats.  I handled it with no problems.  However, I no longer feed the livestock, we have a farm hand to feed the sheep, goats, cattle, donkeys, and our one old Clydesdale mare when she is off competing.   Wish I could take care of them as well, but with the MG, that is not an option.

    • #17288
      Ronald E. Clever
      Participant

      It is ironic that I ran across this subject today as I just had one of our four dogs put to sleep last night.  He was a Newfoundland mix and the sweetest most loveable friend  I could ever want.  From the time I came home from work until I left the next morning he was by my side.  Taking him to the groomer or the vet was a major challenge and I am lucky that my sister and nephew live with me.  I could not take care of these dogs without them but I don’t see how I could not have dogs as they are a great comfort to us.  The care has changed a bit and I try to help as much as I can but because much of the work is when I get home I am not able to do much since it is the end of the day and I am at my weakest.  I try to make up for it on weekends.

    • #17293
      Cyndi DeHoff
      Participant

      Ronald I am so sorry to hear you lost your Newfie.  I also have a Newfie named Wilbur. He is 3 and a 150lbs.

      He was 3 months old when I finally got diagnosed with MG after a few years of symptoms. I got so tired chasing around my new puppy with not enough rest, that my symptoms suddenly came on strong.  The neuro ordered a single fiber EMG which finally showed the MG (I am seronegative).

      I love my giant, lovable, stubborn and hilarious dog , but I’m afraid this will be my last big dog because he is just too strong for me and very hard to handle by myself. He loves to lean against me to show me love which is the last thing I need.  I’m thankful I don’t live alone and I do have help with him.

      The next dog will need be smaller because I just can’t imagine living without an dog in my life

    • #17532
      Ronald E. Clever
      Participant

      I understand how you feel. I want to rescue another big dog, we have 3 little ones but I am letting that up to the others as they will be doing most of the work.

    • #17563
      Norm
      Participant

      We have 7 adorable cats, whom we love like children (possibly more than children — less complicated). My wife does the feeding (all gourmet). And I clean the 8 litter boxes: 3 after my first cup of coffee, 2 after my second cup, and 3 after dinner. Dividing that chore, and others, up makes them easier. (Usually 2 or more boxes are unused.)

    • #17603
      Dave Hall
      Participant

      I have always had dogs.  For years I was very active competing in agility and obedience with my Vizslas.  Now I have a farm, lots of sheep, so we have a lot of border collies and a couple of Australian Shepherds.  I can no longer compete but my wife does.  For me, it is a good day when one of the dogs joins me on the couch for petting.  I can not imagine living without my dogs.

    • #17613
      Kelley
      Participant

      I have a smaller, older dog (29lbs h 11yrs) who luckily, needs very small amounts of exercise. A few toy tosses and when I can, short walks, are sufficient for him. I have trouble brushing him so hubby does that, and lifts him into the sink to help with bathing. When I was hospitalized for 5 weeks 3 years ago for my last crisis, I cried every day for my dog. I missed him incredibly. When his time comes, I’ll get another small dog. Maybe not a puppy, though – I can’t keep up with them!

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